Michigan Avenue Homes

2610 Michigan Avenue – Home of John T. Brennan & Grace Brennan – 1920

This Craftsman-style bungalow is typical of many bungalows on Michigan Avenue.  It has a low-pitched roof line, deeply overhanging eaves, exposed rafters under the eaves and a front porch beneath the extension of the main roof.  It has double-hung windows installed in groups of two on either side of the centered front door and an attic vent at the center of the house’s front-facing gable.

The property is one of 13 existing homes located on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  These homes were originally part of Evans Addition, a subdivision plat recorded by Mayor James Evans, first in Key West (which was originally the county seat for Fort Myers when it was part of Monroe County), then in 1905 with the Lee County Clerk. 

In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company purchased 46 of the Evans Addition lots, including this parcel and all other lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  On October 10, 1919, the company sold three adjacent lots to John T. Brennan, who had recently come to Fort Myers from Battle Creek, Michigan, with his wife, Grace, and their son, Maxwell.

Mr. Brennan, who had been a carpenter and cabinetmaker in Michigan, purchased this parcel for $600, as well as the two adjacent parcels (2616 Michigan and 1615 Evans Avenue).  He promptly started to work on this house, completing it in 1920 and continuing to live here while he was building a second bungalow next door at 2616 Michigan for Alvin Gorton.  He also constructed a two-story “Garage Dwelling,” as the News-Press called it, around the corner at 1615 Evans Avenue.  On October 3, 1925, he sold this home at 2610 Michigan Avenue to C.M. Bailey of Boston. 

Mr. Brennan and his wife, Grace, lived in Fort Myers the rest of their lives, but often returned to Michigan for extended visits during the summer months.  As late as 1935, the city directory showed he continued to work as a contractor from a business office in the garage at 1615 Evans Avenue, which was not sold until after his death in 1944.  Mrs. Brennan remained very involved in community and church activities – including spearheading the fundraising drive for the organ at Edison Congregational Church – until her death in 1967.

Earlier addresses:  1004 Michigan until 1926, 141 Michigan until 1955; Evans Addition, Block 2, Lots 1 & 3.

 

2615-17 Michigan Avenue – Home of Richard D. Hensley & Rosemary F. Hensley – 1955

The ranch-style duplex constructed on this parcel is virtually identical to its “twin” constructed at 1531 Evans Avenue.  Its large jalousie windows, very much in style in the 1950’s, dominate the front façade.  The home’s first occupants were Richard D. Hensley, a Fort Myers policeman, and Rosemary F. Hensley. 

When John Dean recorded his Dean’s Subdivision map on May 1, 1920, this lot was part of a larger 210-by-210-foot parcel shown on the map as “Tippins,” signifying that it had already been conveyed to Fannie Yeats Tippins in 1914.  The 1922 Sanborn Insurance Company map showed only a small outbuilding to be located on the Tippins parcel, and the 1930 Sanborn map again shows a vacant parcel.

This “Tippins” parcel became four separate lots:  1531 Evans Avenue, 1541 Evans Avenue, 2615 Michigan Avenue and 2627 Michigan Avenue. 

A portion of the “Tippins” parcel abutting Block G on Dean’s Subdivision map.

           

 

2616 Michigan Avenue – Home of Alvin Gorton & Sylvia Scholten Gorton – 1921

This two-story Craftsman home has a metal roof and wood shake siding.  Its central doorway is flanked by three windows on each side, and this cluster of three windows is repeated in the attic gable.  This home, like all those on the south side of Michigan Avenue, was not part of the 1920 Dean’s Subdivision, but part of an early subdivision known as “Evan’s Addition.”

In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company purchased 46 of the Evans Addition lots, including this lot and all other lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  In November 1919, the company sold this parcel to John T. Brennan for $500, subject to a building restriction that a home costing at least $1,000 be built on the property.  On March 12, 1921, Mr. Brennan, a general contractor who lived next door at 2610 Michigan Avenue, sold the new house to Alvin and Sylvia Gorton.  This event was reported in the News-Press in July 1921 as follows:  “Alvin Gorton is having a beautiful two-story dwelling built on his property on Michigan Avenue by John Brennan.” 

Alvin Gorton had sold a meat market in Chicago and come to North Fort Myers in 1913 to homestead on land in the Bayshore area, according to a 1963 article in the News-Press.  He told the newspaper that he had pitched a tent for his wife and three daughters to live in until their house could be built on the land.  The 1923 city directory showed the Gortons to be living on Michigan Avenue and Mr. Gorton’s occupation as a “grower, buyer and shipper of Florida vegetables, fruits and melons.”  By 1925, Mr. Gorton had become a realtor, as had almost everyone during the Florida real estate boom.

 In 1928, Mr. Gorton began his 28 years of service as a Lee County Commissioner and cited his proudest accomplishment as his involvement in the construction of the bridge to Sanibel.  In retirement, he devoted himself to numerous civic activities and the 350-400 orchids he grew at his home, now on Hough Street, until his death in 1968.

Mr. Gorton was also on hand to see the romance between his step-daughter, Ethel Scholten, and Florida native Claude Lee Stroup.  The Stroups married in 1919 and purchased the property next door at 2622 Michigan Avenue on March 15, 1921, just 3 days after the Gortons purchased this property at 2616 Michigan.  Mr. Gorton and Mr. Stroup joined forces for quite a few business ventures, including a dealership for Maxwell, Chalmers and Stutz automobiles.

Earlier addresses:  1008 Michigan Avenue, 137 Michigan Avenue; Evans Addition, Block 2, Lot 5.

           

2622 Michigan Avenue – Home of Claude Lee Stroup & Ethel Scholton Stroup – 1921

The bungalow includes classic Craftsman-style features:  a front porch and centered front door, with double-hung windows on either side of the door.  Its second floor dormers create light and space for the upstairs bedroom.

The property is one of 13 existing homes located on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  These homes were originally part of Evans Addition, a subdivision plat recorded by Mayor James Evans, first in Key West (which was originally the county seat for Fort Myers when it was part of Monroe County), then in 1905 with the Lee County Clerk.  

In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company purchased 46 of the Evans Addition lots, including this parcel and all other lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  In November 1919, the Carl F. Roberts Company sold this parcel to Fred N. Loomis and Kate Julia Loomis for $500, subject to a building restriction that any house built on the property must cost at least $1,000.

On March 15, 1921, the property was sold to Claude and Ethel Stroup, a Florida native, and Ethel Scholten, daughter of Sylvia Scholten Gorton, who lived right next door at 2616 Michigan Avenue.  The Gortons had purchased their property just three days before on March 12, 1921.  Both the Stroup house and the Gorton homes are shown on the 1922 Sanford Insurance Company map.  The Stroups lived here until 1925, when they sold the home to Joseph Chambless and made him a $4,500 mortgage loan to finance this purchase.

Claude Lee Stroup was the son of Larkin Moses Stroup, who came to Fort Myers 1888 after walking to Florida from his native Georgia.  After homesteading land along the Peace River, he brought his bride and young daughter to Fort Myers, where he was elected marshall and eventually police chief.  His son, Claude, was born in Fort Myers in 1895, and owned and operated automobile and truck dealerships, including a joint venture for the Maxwell, Chalmers and Stutz automobile dealership with his wife’s step-father and next-door neighbor, Alvin Gorton.  On June 16, 1922, the News-Press reported:

            “Mr. Stroup has just returned from Tampa with a nifty looking 1923 Model Maxwell touring car which sells here delivered at $1,050 (easy terms if desired).  He said today that he will be pleased to demonstrate this classy machine to anyone interested in a ‘better’ automobile.”

After Claude Stroup’s untimely death in 1938 at age 43, Ethel Stroup began a career in law enforcement, first working as a matron in the Lee County jail, then serving as Lee County Deputy Sheriff before her death in 1969.

Earlier addresses:  1012 Michigan until 1926, 133 Michigan until 1955; Evans Addition, Block 2, Lot 7.

         

 2627 Michigan Avenue – Home of Thomas Veal III and Juanita M. Veal – 1942

On May 16, 1941, Thomas Veal III and his wife, Juanita Meguiar Veal, purchased this 60-by-180-foot parcel and constructed the one-story cottage there.  The cottage has remained in the family and is now occupied by Thomas Veal IV.

Thomas Veal II came to Fort Myers from Roopville, Georgia, in 1926 with his wife and young son, Thomas Veal III, his two daughters, and his parents.  The 1920 census showed Thomas Veal II’s occupation as a “merchant – general merchandise” in Roopville; and the family continued that line of work by establishing a grocery store business in Fort Myers.  By 1935, Thomas III had joined his father in the business.

When World War II broke out, Thomas Veal III enlisted in the Army and was a member of “Ken’s Men, a bombardment unit in the South Pacific.  Returning home in 1945, Thomas III rejoined his father in the grocery store business, with a store at 1915 Park Avenue offering “High Grade Groceries, Meats and Poultry,” according to the Fort Myers city directory. 

When John Morgan Dean recorded his Dean’s Subdivision map on May 1, 1920, a large 210-by-210-foot lot at the corner of Michigan Avenue and Evans Avenue was shown on the subdivision map as “Tippins,” signifying that it had already been conveyed to Fannie Tippins.  The 1922 Sanborn Insurance Company map showed only a small outbuilding to be located on the Tippins parcel, and the 1930 Sanborn map shows a vacant parcel.  The Veal cottage was the first residence to be constructed on the Tippins parcel, which became four separate lots in Dean Park:  1531 Evans Avenue, 1541 Evans Avenue, 2615 Michigan Avenue and this parcel.

Portion of the “Tippins” parcel in Block G of Dean Park.

 

2630 Michigan Avenue – Home of Wilhelm F. Reiter and Marie & Marie Reiter – 1922

The bungalow is a perfectly symmetrical bungalow with classic Craftsman-style features:  front porch supported by double columns, exposed roof rafters, a centered front door with double-hung windows on either side of the door, a front-facing gable with a small center window, and side dormers on the second floor to create light and space for the upstairs bedroom.  

The house is similar in design to many of its neighbors on Michigan Avenue and is one of 13 existing homes located on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  These homes were originally part of Evans Addition, a subdivision plat recorded by Mayor James Evans, first recorded in Key West (which was originally the county seat for Fort Myers when it was part of Monroe County), then recorded in 1905 with the Lee County Clerk.  In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company purchased 46 of the Evans Addition lots, including this parcel and all other lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue. 

On May 24, 1921, The Carl F. Roberts Company sold this property to Wilhelm Reiter for $600, subject to a building restriction that a house costing at least $1,000 be built on the parcel.  By 1922, the house was completed, as shown on the 1922 Sanford Insurance Company map.

Wilhelm F. Reiter, born in Germany in 1888, immigrated to the United States as a young man and married his wife Marie, also from Germany, in 1912.  By 1913, the Reiters were living in Arcadia, Florida, when the first of their two children were born.  By 1920, the family was living on Cottage Street in Fort Myers, with Mr. Reiter employed as a carpenter.  In 1923, Mr. Reiter was employed as a foreman at the Seminole Lumber & Manufacturing Company.  In October 1925, the Reiters sold this bungalow to Henry and Ora Sicks and eventually moved to Miami sometime before 1934.

Earlier addresses:  1016 Michigan until 1926, 129 Michigan until 1955; Evans Addition, Block 2, Lot 9.

           

2635 Michigan Avenue – Home of George W. Capling – 1921

This bungalow, with its columned front porch, includes the classic Craftsman front porch and exposed roof rafters.  Its first owner was George W. Capling, a florist and landscape architect, who lived there with his extended family from 1921 to 1925. 

In 1920, Dean Development Company sold this lot to Mr. George W. Capling for a stated consideration of $100, with a building restriction that a house costing at least $2,000 be built on the property.  By 1921, Mr. Capling, a widower, and his three adult children had moved into this house on Michigan, as shown in the 1921 city directory.  And by May 1925, Mr. Capling had sold this house to Ora and Grace Sicks for $6,000.  The Florida real estate boom was in full swing!

Mr. Capling, who immigrated from England as a young man, and his wife, Florence, were early settlers of Arcadia, Florida, where their three children were born.  By 1910, the family had moved to Fort Myers, first living on McGregor Boulevard.  After Mrs. Capling’s untimely death in 1915 at age 46, the family moved to a home on Evans Avenue, then into this bungalow on Michigan as soon as it was completed.

The Capling family definitely filled this 3-bedroom, 1039-square-foot home.  In 1921, the household included not only Mr. Capling, age 73, but his eldest son, George F. Capling, 26, who had begun his career as a fishing guide on the Caloosahatchee; Charles C. Capling, 24, who was a boat captain, and his daughter Frances, 21.  When Frances married boat captain John Mitchell Barnes in April 1922, Mr. Barnes and a new baby, Lois Barnes, became part of the household.

Fortunately, both sons soon married and moved out, while the senior Mr. Capling, his daughter Frances (widowed in 1930) and granddaughter Lois continued to live together in a nearby home further east on Michigan Avenue until Mr. Capling’s death in 1944 at age 93.

Earlier addresses:  1019 Michigan until 1926, 126 Michigan until 1955; Dean’s Subdivision, Block G, Lot 8.

 

2636 Michigan Avenue – Winter Home of Gustav and Selma Bramberg – circa 1923

As shown on early photos, this two-story home was constructed in the Florida vernacular style, with a deep front porch designed to keep the house cool in warm weather.  It has been remodeled extensively in recent years.

The property is one of 13 existing homes located on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  These homes were originally part of Evans Addition, a subdivision plat recorded by Mayor James Evans, first in Key West (which was originally the county seat for Fort Myers when it was part of Monroe County), then in 1905 with the Lee County Clerk. 

In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company purchased 46 of the Evans Addition lots, including this parcel and all other lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  Carl F. Roberts was also a friend of the couple who purchased this parcel.  The News-Press reported on Feb. 4, 1914: 

            “Mr. and Mrs. Gust Bramberg of Chicago, who have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Roberts for several weeks, left yesterday for home.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Bramberg were delighted with Fort Myers and took away with them a great deal of literature describing the beauties and opportunities of this section of the state.”

In 1918, Mr. Bramberg paid a fourth visit to Fort Myers, this time with his partner in his Chicago real estate firm, and the News-Press reported that both men were “delighted to be here after tunneling thru snow.”  Finally, on March 5, 1921, the Brambergs were ready to buy and purchased this parcel from The Carl F. Roberts Company for $700, subject to a building restriction that a house costing at least $1,000 be built on the parcel.  The Sanborn Insurance Company map shows now house existed on this property in 1922, so it seems likely that the existing home was constructed in 1923 or later.

Selma Bramberg and her husband, Gustav, owned the property until 1938, when they sold it to Kate L. Carlton of Lee County for $300.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Bramberg were born in Sweden and were married in Chicago in 1894.  They lived in Oak Park, Illinois, with Fort Myers as a winter home, until Mrs. Bramberg’s death in 1938 and Mr. Bramberg’s death in 1944. 

Earlier addresses:  1021 Michigan Avenue, 125 Michigan Avenue; Evans Addition, Block 2, Lot 11

 

 

2642 Michigan Avenue – Duplex – 1957

Like its its neighbor on 2668 Michigan, this ranch duplex features horizontal lines under a low-slung roof.  It incorporates two carport areas in the enclosed area between the two units.  The front doors are inconspicuous, which was typical of the ranch style.

The building was constructed in 1957, according to Lee County tax records.  The city directory for that year shows this property as “vacant,” and it seems likely that this duplex was built as an investment, with the property occupied by tenants. 

This property, like all the Dean Park homes on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, is part of Evans Addition, a subdivision plat recorded by Mayor James Evans, first in Key West (which was originally the county seat for Fort Myers when it was part of Monroe County), then in 1905 with the Lee County Clerk. 

In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company purchased 46 of the Evans Addition lots, including this parcel and all other lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue.  On May 24, 1921, The Carl F. Roberts Company sold this property to Wilhelm Reiter of Lee County for $600, subject to a building restriction that a house costing at least $1,000 be built on the parcel. 

Evans Addition, Block 2, Lots 13 & 15.

 

2645 Michigan Avenue – Cottage of Elizabeth M. Felton – circa 1950

This modest one-story cottage was constructed in 1950, according to Lee County tax records.  It replaced an earlier one-story home that was located on the parcel and was shown on the 1922 Sanborn Insurance Company map.

On March 10, 1922, Dean Development Company conveyed this parcel to James H. Ingram for $900, subject to a restriction that any home built on this parcel cost at least $3,000.  Since the 1922 Sanford Insurance Company map shows a one-story dwelling located on this lot, it can be concluded that James H. Ingram and his wife, Ruth, were the first occupants of the original house and lived there until they sold it in 1925 for $7,500.

It is not known when the original house was destroyed.  In 1942, after many intervening owners, the property was purchased by Elizabeth M. “Bettye” Felton, a Fort Myers real estate agent employed for many years by Douglass-Chambers Inc.  She continued to make this her home until 1957.  Her parents, William and Fannie Felton of Maryland, began coming to Fort Myers for the winter in the 1920’s, and her aunt and namesake, Elizabeth M. Felton, lived next door at 2647 Michigan Avenue from 1928 until 1930.

Earlier address:  1025 Michigan until 1926; 122 Michigan until 1955; Dean’s Subdivision, Lot G, Lot 9.

 

2647 Michigan Avenue – Home of Elizabeth M. Felton – 1928

This two-story home is an example of the “American Foursquare” style, an American house style popular from the mid-1890’s to the late 1930’s.  Like Craftsman homes, it was a reaction to the ornate and mass-produced elements of the late Victorian style.   The American Foursquare was a plain, transitional style that incorporates elements of the Craftsman and Prairie school styles.  An American Foursquare home is typically a square, boxy design, two or two-and-a-half stories high, usually with four large rooms on each floor.  It frequently has a large front porch with wide stairs and a hipped roof. 

Other American Foursquare homes in Dean Park include 2773 Providence Street (1921), and its influence can be seen in the two-story Craftsman homes at 2674 Providence Street and 2616 Michigan Avenue. 

On April 25, 1925, the Dean Development Company conveyed this parcel to Floyd J. Swinney of Lee County for $4,000, subject to a restriction that a house costing at least $3,500 be built on the parcel.  The deed also included a second lot on Michigan Avenue, Lot 12.  On February 13, 1928, Mr. Swinney sold the parcel to Elizabeth M. Day Felton of Philadelphia, who had begun visiting Fort Myers after her husband died in 1924.

The News-Press reported on September 1, 1928, that Mrs. Felton had just obtained a building permit to build a $6,000 residence.  Soon after that, Mrs. Felton and her sister-in-law, Mary E. Felton moved into the new home.  After Elizabeth Felton’s sudden death on August 26, 1930, Mary E. Felton and her two younger sisters, Fannie Day Felton and Emma Day Cuthbertson, continued to live in the home, along with her niece and namesake Elizabeth M. Felton (Fannie’s daughter).

Earlier address:  1025 Michigan until 1926; 118 Michigan until 1955; Dean’s Subdivision, Block G, Lot 10 and part of Lot 9.

 

2657 Michigan Avenue – Home of Roscoe G. Norton & Mary V. Norton – 1926

This bungalow, with its arched front porch and elegant lines, is a particularly gracious example of the Craftsman style.  Its stucco siding was a popular choice for many Dean Park homes.  Its outstanding Craftsman features include the massive, arched front porch and the original oak door.

On May 8, 1922, Dean Development Company conveyed this parcel to R.W. Wiedemann of Alexander, Illinois, subject to a restriction that any home built there cost at least $3,000.  In 1924, Mr. Wiedemann sold the property – still a vacant lot – to Mary V. Norton for $6,650. 

Roscoe G. Norton and his wife, Mary, came to Fort Myers from upstate New York, where Mr. Norton had been working as a hotel keeper, grocer and then as a “lumberman” in the small town of Forestport.  By 1926, with Mr. and Mrs. Norton in their mid-50’s, the couple began to spend their winters in this bungalow on Fort Myers.  To complete the transformation, Mr. Norton switched his career to real estate, the avocation of almost everyone living in Fort Myers during the land boom of the 1920’s.

The Nortons remained in their home on Michigan until Mr. Norton’s death in 1937 at age 66, and Mrs. Norton continued her pattern of living in Fort Myers during the winter and returning to upstate New York in the summer until sold the home to Frank B. Jones in 1948 for the consideration of $10,000.  From the 1960’s until 2017, the home was occupied by the Bristol family.

Earlier address:  114 Michigan Avenue; Dean’s Subdivision, Block G, Lot 11.

           

2658-60 Michigan Avenue – Home of George W. Ingersoll and Kathleen Ingersoll – 1928

This 1,500-square-foot house is a classic bungalow, with a hipped roof, wide front porch with center doorway, and attic dormer located in the center of the roof.

The property, like all the Dean Park homes on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, is part of Evans Addition, a subdivision plat recorded by Mayor James Evans, first in Key West (which was originally the county seat for Fort Myers when it was part of Monroe County), then in 1905 with the Lee County Clerk.  In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company purchased 46 of the Evans Addition lots, including this parcel and all other lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue. 

On February 16, 1928, George W. Ingersoll and Kathleen Ingersoll purchased this double lot in Evans Addition for $2,500 from the Roberts Company.  The Ingersolls, who were residents of upstate New York, began coming to Fort Myers for the winter in 1919.  Mr. Ingersoll, a building contractor, appears to have constructed this bungalow as an investment and leased it for many years before selling it in 1942 to Elizabeth (Bettye) Felton, who lived across the street.          City directories show the Ingersolls living at a number of addresses, but never at this dwelling.  After Mr. Ingersoll’s death at age 77 in 1935, Mrs Ingersoll continued to make Fort Myers her home until her death in 1966 at age 83.

Other address:  115 Michigan Avenue; Evans Addition, Block 2, Lots 17 & 19.

           

2668 Michigan Avenue – Duplex Built for Derick S. Hartshorn – 1957

This ranch-style duplex and the identical “mirror image” duplex constructed at 1610-12 Cranford Avenue were both constructed in 1957.  The owner, Derick S. Hartshorn, had purchased two adjacent lots, Lots 21 and 23 of Block 2 in Evans’ Addition.  But instead of building one house on each lot, he decided to split both lots down the middle and constructed this home on the southerly half of Lots 21 and 23 and the Cranford duplex on the northerly half. 

The four front doors of both duplexes face each other on a little-noticed courtyard, and the carports serving this home face the rear alley.  Both duplexes were built as investment properties and were first occupied by a series of tenants, often seasonal.  This short 1963 announcement from the News-Press is typical: “Mr. and Mrs. Arlo Shook of Uniontown, Ohio, are spending the season at 1610 Cranford Ave.”

These two lots, like all the lots in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, are part of Evans Addition, one of the earliest Fort Myers subdivisions.  Major James Evans developed Evans Addition from a 275-acre land grant parcel he purchased in 1880 from the federal government.  Each of the 366 lots in Evans Addition was 50 feet wide and 150 feet deed, as shown on a map recorded in 1905 with the Lee County Clerk.

In 1913, The Carl F. Roberts Company, a prominent Fort Myers developer, purchased 46 of the lots in Evans Addition for a total purchase price of $6,000. In 1925, The Carl F. Roberts Company sold this property to C.R. Wade of Fort Myers.  It had many subsequent owners, but remained vacant until this duplex was constructed in 1957.  On November 25, 1956, Mr. Hartshorn was granted a $17,000 building permit for this duplex and on December 16, 1956, he was granted another $17,000 building permit for the duplex on Cranford Avenue.

Derick S. Hartshorn was a mechanical engineer, born in 1883 in Worchester, MA.  He and his wife, Mary, married in 1909 in Boston.  The couple had three children and Mr. Hartshorn’s career took the family to New Jersey, North Carolina, Maine, Massachusetts and New York.  Mrs. Hartshorn was a church organist for many years in Springfield, Massachusetts.

In 1950, the Hartshorns decided to move to Fort Myers, while still maintaining a winter home in Johnsonville, New York.  Mr. Hartshorn began a second career as a real estate developer and undertook a series of residential construction projects.  After Mrs. Hartshorn’s death in December 1966 at age 82, Mr. Hartshorn remarried in July 1967 and died the following September at age 84.

Evans Addition, Block 2, northerly half of Lots 21 & 23.

 

2675 Michigan Avenue – Home of Harry C. Stucky & Ellen Stucky – 1920

This one-story bungalow at the corner Michigan and Cranford Avenue was the first of two homes in Dean Park owned by Harry C. Stucky and his wife, Ellen Mary Stucky.  Mr. Stucky was a prominent Fort Myers businessman for many years and a partner of the furniture firm Robb & Stucky.  The Stuckys moved into this new bungalow in 1920 and, as Mr. Stucky’s business prospered, they decided to move into a larger home in Dean Park at 2644 Providence Street.

On March 5, 1917, Dean Development Company sold this parcel to Frederick E. Trapp of Lee County for $1,400, subject to a building restriction that a single-family home costing at least $2,000 be constructed on the parcel.  But Mr. Trapp did not construct anything on the property and instead sold it to Mr. Stucky.  On November 26, 1923, the Stuckys sold the home to Richard J. McGuire and his wife, Margaret, who made this bungalow their home until 1947.

The Stuckys also sold the McGuires all the furniture located in the house, and the Bill of Sale recorded on the land records provides a perfect record, room by room, of what a well-furnished house in 1923 might include: 

            Front room:  day bed with bolster, two small rockers, desk and desk chair, rug, shades, draperies, waste paper basket.

            Living room:  shades, draperies, rug, table, settee, rocker, chair, fire screen, floor lamp.

            Room back of living room:  rocker, chair, rug, shades, draperies, folding screen, muffin stand, table, four chairs.

            Middle bed room:  bed, box spring, mattress, rug, vanity dresser, chiffonier, shades, drapes, round table.

            Back bedroom:  Bed, box spring, mattress, vanity dresser, chiffonette, shades, drapes, rug.

            Bath:  Mirror, table, shades, drapes

            Kitchen:  Stove, cabinet, hot water heater tank, rug

            Pantry:  refrigerator, table

            Back porch:  porch shades, rug, fern box in house

            Front porch:  swing, table, 3 rockers

            Other:  all awnings on house, ferns on porch, garden tools, lawn mower, hose, fire place wood.

            Earlier addresses:  1051 Michigan until 1926; 102 Michigan until 1955; Dean’s Subdivision, Block G, Lot 13 and east 6 feet of Lot 12.   

 

2705 Michigan Avenue – Home of Walter E. Schultz & Mae Z. Schultz – 1956

This double lot was originally the site of a five-room two-story home and rear garage apartment probably constructed by Henry C. Case, who purchased and then developed about a dozen lots from Dean Development Corporation.  The original dwelling shows up on the 1930 Sanborn Insurance Company map and was in existence in 1950, when it was advertised for sale for $6,700.

At some point the original dwelling was demolished and, in 1956, the lot was split in two.  The southerly halves of Lots 12 and 13 became the site of a new ranch-style home that was owned from 1956 to 1966 by Walter E. Schultz and Mae Z. Schultz.  The northerly halves of Lots 12 and 13 became 1585 Cranford Avenue.  

Mr. Schultz, a bricklayer and carpenter, was born in Germany in 1899 and immigrated to the Detroit area with his family when he was just two years old.  He and Mrs. Schultz married in 1923 in Michigan and had three sons.  A 1942 article in the News-Press described Mr. Schultz as a “Michigan tourist,” and by 1950 the couple had moved to Fort Myers Beach.  Mr. Schultz continued his occupation as a carpenter and both were involved in many community activites, as well as in frequent visits to their grown sons.

Earlier address:  42 Michigan for the original house on Lot 13; Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, southerly half of Lots 12 and 13

 

2716 Michigan Avenue – Whitney Apartments – 1926

This brick apartment building is typical of an apartment building style that became popular in Fort Myers during the 1920’s.  Each of the four apartments has an open-air porch.  The Art Deco influence is reflected in the geometric treatment of the roof line. A separate apartment building at the rear of the property has two additional units.

Like all parcels in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, this parcel was purchased by The Carl F. Roberts Company in 1913, who purchased 46 lots in Evans Addition for a total price of $6,000.  On April 10, 1924, nine of these lots, including this property, were purchased by John M. Dean, then transferred to the Fort Myers Realty Company, then sold to Judge Frank A. Whitney for $6,000 on August 1, 1924. 

By 1926, the Whitney Apartments were completed and Judge Whitney and his wife, Mamie, moved right in and remained there the rest of his life.  Judge Whitney was born in Kansas in 1869.  His family moved to Alachua County, Florida, when he was just two years old.  But he headed north for college at the University of Chicago and law school at Northwestern University.  He and his wife Mamie, whom he met in Chicago, moved to Arcadia, Florida, where he practiced law, and then to Lakeland, Florida, where he became a circuit court judge.  In 1922, Judge Whitney and his wife moved to Fort Myers, where he became active in Democratic politics and then served as mayor from 1933 to 1935.  Among the “hot” issues Mr. Whitney tacked as mayor:  whether the Australian pines originally planted along Dean Park streets should be removed because their interference with radio signals.

After Mamie died in 1932, he married a family friend almost 20 years his junior, Louise Eggert of Chicago.  After Judge Whitney’s death in 1951, Louise resided in the Whitney Apartments until her death in 1959.

Earlier Address:  39-41 West Michigan Avenue; Evans Addition, Block 1, Lots 29 & 31.

           

2721 Michigan Avenue – Home of Maurice M. Achard & Nannie Elizabeth Achard – 1923

This Craftsman bungalow is one of about a dozen homes built in Dean Park by Fort Myers developer Henry C. Case.  The house includes the tapered porch columns typical of many bungalow porches and the attic dormer in the center of the roof.

Mr. Case bought this parcel on April 24, 1923, from Dean Development Company for $1,000, subject to a deed restriction that any house built on the parcel cost at least $3,500.  He constructed the bungalow in less than six months and then sold it to Maurice M. Achard and his wife, Nannie Elizabeth Achard, subject to two mortgages totaling $3,800.  The Achard family, which included his two young children, lived there until March 1925, when they sold the home to Emil W. Opitz and moved to a home of McGregor Avenue.

Mr. and Mrs. Achard, from Arkansas and Alabama respectively, first lived in Tampa where Mr. Achard worked as a commercial produce salesman.  After moving to Fort Myers, Mr. Achard worked as a salesman for Bryan, Keefe & Adams, a wholesale grocery store supplier, and became very involved in Boy Scout events with his son, Thomas.  The Achards remained in Fort Myers for the rest of their lives and are buried in Fort Myers Cemetery.

Earlier addresses:  1113 Michigan, 38 West Michigan; Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, Lot 14.

           

2727-29 Michigan Avenue – Home of Louis H. Furen & Alma M. Furen – 1941

The modest cottage on this property was built in 1941 by Louis H. Furen, Jr. and his wife, Alma.  In 1925, this parcel was sold by Dean Development Company to H.C. Case for $1,200 , with a deed restriction requiring any house built on the property cost at least $1,500.  Nevertheless, the parcel remained vacant until the Furen home was constructed in 1941.

In the early 1880’s, the Furen family settled in Orange County, Florida.  Mr. Furen’s grandfather, John W. Furen, Sr., was a cabinetmaker born in Holland and first settling in West Virginia before moving south to Orange County, Florida.  The oldest son, John W. Furen, Jr., was the first in the family to move to Fort Myers, where he began a farming career around 1900 and eventually became one of the successful citrus growers and packers in the region. 

Louis H. Furen, Sr. was the youngest of John W. Furen, Sr.’s nine children.  Louis Sr., his wife Alma and their young son Louis Jr. came from Orlando to Fort Myers in 1931.  From 1932 through 1940, the Furen family had their residence at the Lee County Jail, due to Mr. Furen’s position as a deputy sheriff.  When the Furens entertained, it was at the family cottage on Fort Myers Beach.

In 1941, the family moved into this new cottage on Michigan Avenue, with Louis Furen Sr. employed as a policeman and Louis Jr. joining the Coast Guard during World War II.  After the War, Louis Jr. returned home and rose to Vice President of First Federal Savings & Loan Association in Fort Myers, while still having time for his 1941 blue Chrysler and the activities of the Antique Auto Club of Fort Myers. 

After Louis Sr.’s death in 1975, Alma Furen remained in this Michigan Avenue home until selling it in 1983 and moving in with Louis Jr. at his home on nearby Palm Avenue.

Louis H. Furen, Jr. became a beloved figure in Dean Park.  He lived at 1517 Palm Avenue from 1981 until his death in 2016, at age 93.  He was an active member of the Dean Park Historic District Board of Directors from the date of its formation in 1997 and, on many afternoons, could be seen relaxing on the bench at the “Triangle” in the center of Dean Park.

Earlier address:  36 Michigan Avenue; Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, Lot 15.

 

2732 Michigan Avenue – Home of Sam M. Thomas & Kathryn A. Thomas – 1946

This ranch home was constructed for Sam M. Thomas and his wife, Kathryn, who purchased the parcel on January 26, 1946.  By the end of 1946, the home was completed, according to the Lee County tax records.    

Like all parcels in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, this parcel was purchased by The Carl F. Roberts Company in 1913, who purchased 46 lots in Evans Addition for a total price of $6,000.  The 1922 Sanborn Insurance Company map shows this as a vacant parcel.  In 1924, nine of these lots, including this property, was purchased by John M. Dean, the developer of Dean Park, with a $9,000 purchase money mortgage from The Carl F. Roberts Company.  Mr. Dean re-sold these parcels in 1925 to the Fort Myers Realty Company.

Sam Morgan Thomas was born in Kentucky in 1895 and grew up in Ohio.  He graduated as an electrical engineer from the University of Cincinnati then held a variety of jobs (printing business, radio salesman, electrical engineer) in the Cincinnati area. He and his first wife, Helene, had two daughters, both born in Ohio.

In 1929, Sam’s father, Joseph V. Thomas, began a furniture repair and refinishing business at 2802 Michigan Avenue in a building brought down from Sarasota on the Atlantic Coastline Railroad.  And, in fact, it was the old Sarasota old railroad freight depot.  From 1941-1948, Sam worked for the Army-Air Force an engineer in the photographic laboratory at Wright Field in Dayton, Ohio.  Then Sam and his second wife, Kathryn, decided to join Sam’s father in Fort Myers at Thomas Refinishing Shop; and Sam operated this refinishing business until his death in March 1980.  Kathryn continued to occupy this ranch home until selling it to its present owner, Perdé Williams, in 1988.

Earlier address:  29 West Michigan Avenue; Evans Addition, Block 1, Lots 33 & 35.

 

2733 Michigan Avenue – Winter Home of Adolph & Cecile F. Grotta – 1922

The “bones” of this modest three-bedroom bungalow remain intact.  However, its porch has been remodeled over the years and includes slender brick columns and a partially enclosed porch with slim porch supports.  

On January 21, 1922, Dean Development Company transferred this parcel to John Dean’s United Construction Company, which is the step Dean customarily took when he planned to construct the house himself.  Because the completed house appears on the 1922 Sanborn Insurance Company map, its construction date can be set at 1922. 

It appears that this house was originally rented to tenants, and the first known tenant was John Mitchell Barnes, as shown in the 1923 city directory.  Mr. Mitchell was a local boat captain who married Frances Capling, daughter of neighbor George Capling, just down the block at 2635 Michigan Avenue. In 1925, the city directory shows the tenants to be Hugh G. McLucas and Henry M. Land.

In April 1926, United Construction Company sold the house to Kate H. Coffey for $3,600; and Mrs. Coffey “flipped” it that September to Adolph & Cecile F. Grotta, who maintained their permanent residence in Philadelphia.  There is no evidence from Fort Myers city directories that they ever lived full-time on Fort Myers; and in 1929, they sold the bungalow to Title Investment Company, a corporation based in Fort Myers.

Earlier addresses:  1125 Michigan Avenue; Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, Lot 16.

           

2739 Michigan Avenue – Home of Lynn C. Cool & Pearl Cool – 1947

This one-story home is one of several residences built on Michigan Avenue in the 1940’s.  Its transitional style includes traditional double-hung windows, in grouping of three, and a centered front door with Craftsman-style brackets supporting the front door overhang.  At the same time, these elements are combined with features that foreshadow the ranch style:  the low-slung hipped roof and the modest front door.  

The house was built in 1947 for painting contractor Lynn C. Cool and his wife Pearl, who came to Fort Myers in 1946, along with their son Harold, also a painter.  On July 1, 1947, the News-Press reported that building permit was issued to Mr. Cool for the construction of a five-room dwelling for at a cost of $5,000.   The next year, a second building permit was issued to Mr. Cool for a “frame servants quarters, 24 feet square” at a cost of $1,600 for the rear of the property.

Mr. Cool was born in 1884 Lake George, New York, and lived in the Syracuse area most of his life.  He did not come to Fort Myers until early 1946, when the Cools purchased a small bungalow nearby at 2721 Michigan Avenue on February 21, 1946.  After renovating and repainting that home, he sold it in August of that year.  Meanwhile he purchased this parcel on June 23, 1947, and promptly applied for the necessary building permit for construction of this new home.  By 1949, the the Cools decided to sell this home and move to the St. Petersburg area, where they lived until their deaths in 1965.

The original lot was one of eleven parcels sold by the Dean Development Company to Fort Myers developer Henry C. Chase.  The prices paid for this property show the Florida land boom in full swing:  On January 3, 1924, Mr. Chase paid $1,200 for the parcel.  On April 27, 1925, Mr. Chase sold it to Harry W. Clark for $2,500.  On October 12, 1925, Mr. Clark sold the parcel for $4,200.  However, by 1946, the boom had ended and this parcel was sold for a mere $500.

Earlier address:  24 West Michigan Avenue; Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, Lot 17.

 

2747 Michigan Avenue – Home of Reuben R. Slappey and Jennie Booth Slappey – 1925

With two front gables, this bungalow also has the tapered columns and roof brackets are typical of the Craftsman style.  Its wrap-around porch offers a gracious location to relax in warm weather.  The interior fireplace is flanked by French doors, and the floors are Florida heart pine.  The home is virtually identical to its “twin” next door at 2759 Michigan Avenue, which was also built by Fort Myers developer Henry C. Case.

On January 1924, Mr. Case sold this home to Reuben R. Slappey for $5,250, and Mr. Slappey expanded his property by purchasing the adjacent property (Lot 19) next door in 1925. 

Born in 1886 to a farming family in Georgia, both Mr. Slappey and his parents later moved to Jacksonville, where he embarked on a series of sales jobs, first for Knight Crockery Company and then for Florida Paper Company.  He married Jennie Booth in 1914, and the couple moved to Tampa. 

In 1923, the Slappeys moved to Fort Myers and Mr. Slappey bought a 50 percent interest in Schlossberg’s a “$5.00 Limit Store” in Fort Myers.  In the 1920’s, business at Schlossberg’s was booming and occupied a 3,500-square-foot store at the corner of Main Street and Patio de Leon before moving to an even larger space on the first floor of the Bradford Hotel building at 1026 First Street.  But by 1930, Schlossberg’s had gone bankrupt and Mr. Slappey moved back to Jacksonville, where he resumed his previous career as a commercial salesman for a paper company. 

Previous addresses: 1127 Michigan Avenue, 20 West Michigan Avenue; Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, Lot 18 & Lot 19 (west portion).

 

2748 Michigan Avenue – Rental Property of Louis H. Furen – 1945

The original cottage at 2748 Michigan Avenue was a modest one-bedroom structure.  Over the years, there garage and front porch were enclosed and another addition was constructed.

Like all parcels in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, this parcel was purchased by The Carl F. Roberts Company in 1913, who purchased 46 lots in Evans Addition for a total price of $6,000.  The 1922 Sanborn Insurance Company map shows this as a vacant parcel.  In 1924, nine of these lots, including this property, was purchased by John M. Dean, the developer of Dean Park, with a $9,000 purchase money mortgage from The Carl F. Roberts Company.  Mr. Dean re-sold these parcels in 1924 to The Fort Myers Realty Company, subject to the Roberts mortgage. 

On July 17, 1944, this parcel was purchased by Louis H. Furen, Jr., who already owned and occupied the home across the street at 36 Michigan Avenue.  Mr. Furen owned this cottage and rented it out to various tenants until 1974, when he sold it to James and Gail Cash.

The first occupants of the cottage appear to be Solon S. Duncan, a detective with the Atlantic Coastline Railroad, and his wife Charlotte and two sons.  The Duncan family was living in the cottage in 1946, but soon moved to nearby Evans Avenue. 

The 1947 Fort Myers city directory shows Willard E. Johnson as the occupant.  Mr. Johnson was the parts manager of Dixie Motors and was a newly-wed, having married Mamie Frances Kelley of Atlanta on June 2, 1946.  The Johnsons did not remain tenants here for long and purchased a home at 42 Second Street where they lived for many years.

In 1949, New Yorker Edward A. Illsche and his wife Margaret arrived in Fort Myers and would be tenants in this home for almost ten years.  Mr. Illsche founded a variety of businesses in Fort Myers, including Sewing Machines O’Florida and several publications, the Real Estate Review, the Real Estate Guide and the Lee County News and Shopper.  He also was an unsuccessful candidate for City Council in 1960, campaigning in favor of improved paving and drainage in Fort Myers.

Other address:  21 West Michigan Avenue; Evans Addition, Block 1, Lots 37 & 39.

 

2758 Michigan Avenue – Home of Floyd A. Shellabarger & Leo W. Shellabarger – 1960

This ranch was constructed in 1960 for Fort Myers’ Fire Chief Floyd A. Shellabarger and his wife, Leo W. Shellabarger.  Typical of the ranch style, it features horizontal lines and a modest front door capped with an overhang supported by decorative wrought iron columns.

Like all parcels in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, this parcel was purchased by The Carl F. Roberts Company in 1913, who purchased 46 lots in Evans Addition for a total price of $6,000.  In 1924, nine of these lots, including this property, were purchased by John M. Dean, the developer of Dean Park, with a $9,000 purchase money mortgage from The Carl F. Roberts Company.  Mr. Dean re-sold these parcels in 1924 to The Fort Myers Realty Company, subject to the Roberts mortgage.

This lot remained empty until the Shellabargers constructed a new ranch home on the parcel and moved here from their home just one block away on Second Street.  Mr. Shellabarger was born in 1910 in Oregon to Delbert and Bertha Shellagarger, who had moved west to North Dakota in time to be counted in the 1900 census, then to Portland, Oregon, for the 1910 census. 

By 1926, the family had relocated to Fort Myers.  Floyd, just 16, volunteered at the Fort Myers Fire Department and opened Modern Dry Cleaners on Hendry Street.  By 1931, he was a full-time Fire Department employee and a remained one until his retirement in 1970, with the exception of his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II.  His Fire Department career was capped by his appointment as Chief in 1966.

Mrs. Leo Virginia Shellabarger was a Texas native who came to Fort Myers in 1939 and worked as a stenographer for the State of Florida.  The Shellabargers were married in 1944.  They lived at this home from 1960 until Mrs. Shellabarger’s death in 1973, and Mr. Shellagarger still owned the home when he passed away in 1995 at age 84. 

Evans Addition, Block 1, Lots 37 & 39.

 

2759 Michigan Avenue – Home of Charles L. Greer & Leo Virginia Greer – 1924

This is one of at least six bungalows constructed on Michigan Avenue by Fort Myers developer Henry C. Case.  It is virtually identical to the bungalow constructed next door at 2747 Michigan Avenue, both having double front gables and a wrap-around front porch.    

In March 1924, H.C. Case purchased this parcel from Dean Development Company for $1,200, subject to a restriction that a house costing at least $3,500 be built on the parcel.  After constructing the bungalow on the premises, Mr. Case sold it to Charles L. Greer and Lee Virginia Greer later that year for the purchase price of $5,350.   The parcel was expanded on in 1926, when the Greers purchased the easterly half of Lot 19 from their next-door neighbor, Reuben Slappey. 

 Mr. Greer was a Texas native to came to Fort Myers sometime prior to 1915, when the city directory shows him working as manager of Cash Grocery Store.  His wife, Roberta Lee Webb Greer, came to Fort Myers at age 16, along with her parents, George and Lula Webb of Kentucky.  Mr. Greer worked in the grocery business throughout his life, and the News-Press shows Mrs. Greer as one of the members of the Dean Park Garden Club.  The Greers and their next-door neighbors, the Slappeys, were friends and the News-Press reported on May 8, 1924:

            “R.R. Slappey and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Greer, motored to Fisheating Creek Thursday morning where they spent the day fishing in the placid waters of that stream, noted as the home of hungry black bass.  It is to be hoped that they had good luck.”

Sadly, on April 7, 1930, the property was sold for $3,000 at a foreclosure sale.  The Greers remained in Fort Myers and and Mr. Greer continued his career in the grocery business – engaging in some real estate business on the side – until his death in 1951 and Mrs. Greers death in 1959. 

Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, Lot 20 and easterly half of Lot 19.

 

2775 Michigan Avenue – Home of James O’Connor Hunt & Emma Albers Hunt – 1924

    

 This is one of at least six bungalows constructed in Dean Park by Fort Myers developer Henry C. Case.  This bungalow, with its wrap-around porch, tapered porch columns and “eyebrow” window in the roof, is a particularly fine example of the Craftsman style.     

Mr. Case purchased Lot 21 of this two-lot parcel from Dean Development Company for $1,200, then sold the completed home to James O’Connor Hunt on October 16, 1924, for a purchase price of $6,000.

 Mr. Hunt and his wife, Emma Albers Hunt, were both natives of Tennessee.  James was born in 1880 and well into his career as a civil engineer when he arrived in Fort Myers in the early 1920’s to undertake the engineering work related to the construction of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad.  His specific responsibility for engineering the roadway between Fort Myers and Naples, which coincidentally crosses Michigan Avenue near his home.

Mr. and Mrs. Hunt did not remain in Fort Myers long.  They sold this home in December 1925, and Mr. Hunt’s career as a civil engineer took him to several number of cities:  Jacksonville, Knoxville, Kansas City and Washington, D.C.   It included 22 years in the Army Corps of Engineers and 15 years working on river and harbor projects in the Washington area.    He served in World War I and was drafted at age 62 to serve in the U.S. Engineering Department during World War II. 

After Mr. Hunt retired in 1951, the Hunts returned to Fort Myers.  However, he soon came out of retirement and served as a consultant on several Lee County water control projects.  Mrs. Hunt – nicknamed “Snappy” – was a bridge player and gardener of note, with her exploits in both fields extensively covered by the News-Press.  Mr. Hunt died in Fort Myers in 1965 at age 85.  Mrs. Hunt returned to her native Knoxville and died there in 1973 at age 87.

The bungalow was constructed on Lot 21 of this two-lot parcel, and the second parcel (Lot 23) was added in 1948, when Lot 21 was sold by John Dean’s widow, Annie, to C.M. Parnell & Agnes Parnell, owners of this bungalow in the 1940’s.

Earlier address:  1145 Michigan Avenue; Dean’s Subdivision, Block I, Lot 21 & 22.

 

2790 Michigan Avenue – Home of Oscar Bliss Wharf – 1955

This cottage was one of several cottages built on Michigan Avenue in the 1950’s.  This home, with its hipped roof, is similar to the house built across the street at 2739 Michigan in 1947, but with elements more typical of the 1950’s ranch style, including the wrought iron columns on each side of the front door and the jalousie windows.  It was built in 1955 for Oscar B. Wharf, a widowed carpenter originally from Ohio.

Like all parcels in Dean Park on the southerly side of Michigan Avenue, this parcel was purchased by The Carl F. Roberts Company in 1913, who purchased 46 lots in Evans Addition for a total price of $6,000.  In 1924, nine of these lots, including this property, was purchased by John M. Dean, the developer of Dean Park, with a $9,000 purchase money mortgage from The Carl F. Roberts Company.  Mr. Dean re-sold these parcels in 1924 to The Fort Myers Realty Company, subject to the Roberts mortgage.

This lot remained empty until Mr. Wharf purchased the parcel from Alma Furen (who lived nearby at 2727 Michigan Avenue) on March 25, 1955.  Two days later, Mr. Wharf applied for a building permit to construct a “$9,000 five-room CBS house’ on West Michigan Avenue, according to the News-Press, “CBS” being short-hand for a “concrete block and stucco. “

Born in 1884, Mr. Wharf was the oldest of five children in an Ohio farming family.  The youngest daughter, Goldie B. Wharf married Florida native Charles J. Jones in Ohio in 1924, and moved to Punta Gorda soon afterwards.  By 1941, another brother, Harry, had moved to Punta Gorda.  In 1955, Mr. Wharf, widowed since 1945, also moved to Florida after working throughout his life as a carpenter.

By 1958, Mr. Wharf was ready to join the rest of his family in Punta Gorda.  In July of that year, he advertised his home on Michigan Avenue for sale in the News-Press, and on December 3, 1958, sold it for $11,000.  He moved to Punta Gorda, where he was in charge of “card and games sessions” for the Charlotte County Civic Association.  He lived in Punta Gorda until his death there in 1979 at age 94. 

Evans Addition, Block 1, Lots 45 & 47